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Have fun with World Nursery Rhyme Week

For World Nursery Rhyme Week we have teamed up with Scholastic to help you with some rhyming resources, so you can have fun with the class. These resources are something different to do so you don’t get stuck with the same classic nursery rhymes!

Rhythm and rhyme are important ways to help children learn and remember key information. It lets words and concepts stick in their minds, so they won’t forget it! It can help with exploring emotions and real-world situations too.

 

How to incorporate rhyming with music in the classroom.

One of the best ways to engage your pupils with rhyme is through rap. Exploring rhyme through this way can excite all pupils and interest them in important subjects.

Rap gives information to pupils that they will remember as it is paired with a tune. This works well with the rhyming aspect and allows kids to understand difficult topics!

Don’t worry, as to teach lessons that involve rap you don’t need any experience just the passion to try new things!

 

 

 

Check out this fun, short rap that is dinosaur themed!

To answer the question for the Scholastic competition, this download will find what you’re looking for. Just remember to scroll down!

 

 

 

 

How can this resource help my class?

This resource allows children to have fun, so they are fully engaged. Plus, they can learn a mix of subjects. This rap helps improve literacy skills as well as touching upon History, due to the dinosaur theme! It also develops their reading and ability to understand texts.

A useful activity to expand their knowledge in these areas, is getting your class to write their own versions of this rap. This will test their ability to remember key information from the rap and improves their reading and writing. Plus, this will help bring an understanding to the topic too as they solidify what they have learnt by writing their own version!

 

Make use of roleplaying during the week.

Another fantastic way to take part in World Nursery Rhyme Week is through the use of roleplay. Rhymes can be acted out by your class so that the children understand the topic more. Again, doing this will make the key information stick in their brains as they have acted the text out.

 

Underneath the dinosaur rap, you can find this fairy-tale themed rhyme here.

 

You can get the class to act out the different characters that make a fairy-tale, as well as the text itself! This will make the rhyme more fun and allow the children to understand the basics for creating a good story. After doing this, you could even get the class to write their own fairy-tale story in the form of a rhyme to show what they have learnt about the plot.

 

 

 

 

 

How can this resource help my class?

This rhyme will help develop all sorts of skills for your class, when using roleplay. It will develop children’s communication skills as they will work with each other to bring the rhyme alive. This will teach your class the importance of teamwork which is a perfect chance to develop their social skills too! Plus, it gets them to delve into their imagination and allows them to be as creative as they like (bringing lots of fun to their lesson).

Acting the rhyme out helps kids with their sense of awareness of their surroundings and themselves, as well as others around them. This skill is vital to develop as in the future, children will always need to be aware of their surroundings, themselves, and others because it is a part of life. This introduces the skill without them even realising it which they can develop upon in the future through similar activities!

Other areas this resource helps in are: Learning the use of language- how to get the text across in the right way and understanding different tones of voice and, exploring and experimenting with English and language to help understand the topic.

 

 

We have a brilliant offer from Scholastic where you can win a years’ membership to their resource bank!

Enter here 

Good Luck!

 

<a href="https://blog.hope-education.co.uk/author/ebony-feasey/" target="_self">Ebony Feasey</a>

Ebony Feasey

Hope Education writer

17 November 2021

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